UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549


 

FORM 10-Q

 

x

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.

 

 

 

 

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2007.

 

 

 

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.

 

 

 

 

 

For the transition period from                           to                         

 

Commission file number: 001-33757

 


 

THE ENSIGN GROUP, INC.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

Delaware

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

33-0861263

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

27101 Puerta Real, Suite 450
Mission Viejo, CA 92691
(Address of Principal Executive Offices and Zip Code)

 

(949) 487-9500
(Registrants Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 

N/A
(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, If Changed Since Last Report)

 


 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. o Yes                 x No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer  o     Accelerated filer o      Non-accelerated filer x

 

Indicate by a check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined by Rule 12b-2 or the Exchange Act). 

o Yes     x No

 

   As of December 15, 2007, 20,456,380 shares of the registrant’s common stock were outstanding.

 

 



 

THE ENSIGN GROUP, INC.

QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q

FOR THE THREE AND NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2007

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Part I.Financial Information

 

 

 

Item 1.

Financial Statements (unaudited):

1

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006

1

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007 and 2006

2

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the nine months ended September 30, 2007 and 2006

3

 

 

 

 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

5

 

 

 

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

23

 

 

 

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

38

 

 

 

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

39

 

 

Part II.Other Information

 

 

 

Item 1.

Legal Proceedings

40

 

 

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

40

 

 

 

Item 2

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

65

 

 

 

Item 3.

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

66

 

 

 

Item 4.

Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

66

 

 

 

Item 5.

Other Information

66

 

 

 

Item 6.

Exhibits

67

 

 

 

Signatures

68

 

i



 

Part I. Financial Information

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

THE ENSIGN GROUP, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

September 30,
2007

 

December 31,
2006

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

6,418

 

$

25,491

 

Accounts receivable—less allowance for doubtful accounts of $7,582 and $7,543 at September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively

 

47,639

 

45,285

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

8,229

 

4,185

 

Deferred tax asset—current

 

8,669

 

8,844

 

Total current assets

 

70,955

 

83,805

 

Property and equipment, net

 

106,918

 

87,133

 

Insurance subsidiary deposits

 

9,709

 

8,530

 

Deferred tax asset

 

7,386

 

3,714

 

Restricted and other assets

 

3,083

 

2,618

 

Intangible assets, net

 

2,471

 

2,659

 

Goodwill

 

2,882

 

2,072

 

Total assets

 

$

203,404

 

$

190,531

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

11,809

 

$

12,329

 

Accrued wages and related liabilities

 

21,091

 

24,026

 

Accrued self-insurance liabilities—current

 

7,342

 

6,122

 

Other accrued liabilities

 

11,884

 

12,106

 

Current maturities of long-term debt

 

3,004

 

941

 

Total current liabilities

 

55,130

 

55,524

 

Long-term debt—less current maturities

 

60,825

 

63,587

 

Accrued self-insurance liability

 

17,623

 

15,384

 

Deferred rent and other long-term liabilities

 

2,675

 

2,164

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 13)

 

 

 

 

 

Series A redeemable convertible preferred stock; $0.001 par value; 1,000 shares authorized; 685 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively; liquidation preference of $2,330 and $2,401 at September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006 , respectively

 

2,725

 

2,725

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock; $0.001 par value; 20,000 shares authorized; 13,705 and 13,694 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively

 

14

 

14

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

2,488

 

1,250

 

Retained earnings

 

66,708

 

54,724

 

Common stock in treasury, at cost, 745 and 755 shares at September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively

 

(4,784

)

(4,841

)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

64,426

 

51,147

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$

203,404

 

$

190,531

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

1



 

THE ENSIGN GROUP, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

(In thousands, except per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

Revenue

 

$

104,092

 

$

92,338

 

$

302,339

 

$

261,065

 

Expense:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of services (exclusive of facility rent and depreciation and amortization shown separately below)

 

86,176

 

72,792

 

247,177

 

206,142

 

Facility rent—cost of services

 

4,177

 

4,170

 

12,511

 

12,260

 

General and administrative expense

 

3,995

 

3,881

 

11,638

 

10,471

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

1,818

 

1,103

 

5,004

 

2,861

 

Total expenses

 

96,166

 

81,946

 

276,330

 

231,734

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from operations

 

7,926

 

10,392

 

26,009

 

29,331

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

(1,288

)

(734

)

(3,637

)

(2,071

)

Interest income

 

275

 

203

 

973

 

500

 

Other expense, net

 

(1,013

)

(531

)

(2,664

)

(1,571

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income before provision for income taxes

 

6,913

 

9,861

 

23,345

 

27,760

 

Provision for income taxes

 

2,447

 

3,480

 

9,047

 

10,561

 

Net income

 

$

4,466

 

$

6,381

 

$

14,298

 

$

17,199

 

Net income per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

0.32

 

$

0.47

 

$

1.04

 

$

1.27

 

Diluted

 

$

0.26

 

$

0.38

 

$

0.85

 

$

1.03

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

13,506

 

13,312

 

13,463

 

13,356

 

Diluted

 

16,878

 

16,865

 

16,887

 

16,769

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

2



 

THE ENSIGN GROUP, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In thousands)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

14,298

 

$

17,199

 

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

5,013

 

2,861

 

Deferred income taxes

 

(3,497

)

(390

)

Provision for doubtful accounts

 

2,139

 

2,922

 

Stock-based compensation

 

1,207

 

187

 

Loss on disposition of property and equipment

 

14

 

30

 

Change in operating assets and liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

(4,493

)

(713

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

(1,648

)

(5,411

)

Insurance subsidiary deposits

 

(1,179

)

(1,976

)

Accounts payable

 

(520

)

2,063

 

Accrued wages and related liabilities

 

(2,935

)

1,208

 

Other accrued liabilities

 

(905

)

1,646

 

Accrued self-insurance

 

3,459

 

3,046

 

Deferred rent liability

 

36

 

(241

)

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

10,989

 

22,431

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Purchase of property and equipment

 

(15,785

)

(10,908

)

Employee notes, net

 

44

 

(28

)

Restricted and other assets

 

(510

)

(1,099

)

Cash payment for acquisitions

 

(9,452

)

(25,275

)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

(25,703

)

(37,310

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of debt

 

 

14,368

 

Payments on long term debt

 

(700

)

(2,483

)

Issuance of treasury stock upon exercise of options

 

57

 

259

 

Issuance of common stock upon exercise of options

 

32

 

161

 

Dividends paid

 

(1,973

)

(1,479

)

Payments of deferred offering costs

 

(1,690

)

 

Payments of deferred financing costs

 

(84

)

(630

)

Purchase of treasury stock

 

(1

)

(2,800

)

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

(4,359

)

7,396

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents

 

(19,073

)

(7,483

)

Cash and cash equivalents beginning of year

 

25,491

 

11,635

 

Cash and cash equivalents end of year

 

$

6,418

 

$

4,152

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

3



 

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,
2007 2006

 

Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash paid during the period for:

 

 

 

 

 

Interest

 

$

3,225

 

$

2,116

 

Income taxes

 

$

14,617

 

$

12,760

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-cash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer of capital reserves from other assets to property and equipment

 

 

43

 

Conditional asset retirement obligations under FIN 47

 

$

113

 

 

Purchase of property and equipment previously under long-term lease arrangements

 

$

3,355

 

$

 6,772

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

4



 

THE ENSIGN GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Dollars and shares in thousands, except per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

1.             DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

 

The Company —The Ensign Group, Inc., through its subsidiaries (collectively, the Company), provides skilled nursing and rehabilitative care services through the operation of 61 facilities as of September 30, 2007, located in California, Arizona, Texas, Washington, Utah and Idaho. All of these facilities are skilled nursing facilities, other than three stand-alone assisted living facilities in Arizona and Texas and four campuses that offer both skilled nursing and assisted living services located in California, Arizona and Utah. The Company’s facilities, each of which strives to be the facility of choice in the community it serves, provide a broad spectrum of skilled nursing and assisted living services, physical, occupational and speech therapies, and other rehabilitative and healthcare services, for both long-term residents and short-stay rehabilitation patients.  The Company’s facilities have a collective capacity of over 7,400 skilled nursing, assisted living and independent living beds.  As of September 30, 2007, the Company owned 23 of its 61 facilities and operated an additional 38 facilities through long-term lease arrangements, and had options to purchase or purchase agreements for 13 of those 38 facilities.

 

The Company is a holding company with no direct operating assets, employees or revenue. All of the Company’s facilities are operated by separate, wholly-owned, independent subsidiaries, each of which has its own management, employees and assets. One of the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiaries provides centralized accounting, payroll, human resources, information technology, legal, risk management and other centralized services to the other operating subsidiaries through contractual relationships between such subsidiaries.

 

The Company also has a wholly-owned captive insurance subsidiary that provides some claims-made coverage to the Company’s operating subsidiaries for general and professional liability, as well as for certain workers’ compensation insurance liabilities.

 

Other InformationThe accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements as of September 30, 2007 and for the three and nine month periods ended September 30, 2007 and 2006 (collectively, the Interim Financial Statements), are unaudited. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in annual consolidated financial statements have been condensed or omitted, as permitted under applicable rules and regulations. Readers of the Interim Financial Statements should refer to the Company’s audited consolidated statements and notes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2006 which are included in the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, File No. 333-142897 (the Registration Statement) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the SEC).  Management believes that the Interim Financial Statements reflect all adjustments which are of a normal and recurring nature necessary to present fairly the Company’s financial position and results of operations in all material respects. The results of operations presented in the Interim Financial Statements are not necessarily representative of operations for the entire year.

 

Initial Public Offering—In October 2007, the Company’s board of directors approved the Company’s amended and restated certificate of incorporation that became effective immediately following the completion of the Company’s initial public offering (the IPO). The amended and restated certificate of incorporation:

 

·                  authorizes 1,000 shares of preferred stock, $0.001 par value; and

 

·                  authorizes 75,000 shares of common stock, $0.001 par value

 

In November 2007, in connection with the Company’s IPO, the Company sold 4,000 shares of common stock and certain selling stockholders sold 600 shares of common stock, each at the IPO price of $16.00 per share, for proceeds to the Company, net of underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by the Company (Net Proceeds), of approximately $56,545. Concurrently with the closing of the IPO, all previously outstanding shares of preferred stock converted into 2,741 shares of the Company’s common stock.

 

5



 

2.             SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation—The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The Company is the sole member or shareholder of various consolidated limited liability companies and corporations; each established to operate various acquired skilled nursing and assisted living facilities. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Estimates and Assumptions—The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. The most significant estimates in the Company’s consolidated financial statements relate to revenue, allowance for doubtful accounts, intangible assets and goodwill, impairment of long-lived assets, patient liability, general and professional liability, worker’s compensation, and healthcare claims included in accrued self-insurance liabilities, stock-based compensation and income taxes. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Business SegmentsThe Company has a single reporting segment—long-term care services, which includes the operation of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities, and related ancillary services at the facilities. The Company’s single reporting segment is made up of several individual operating segments grouped together principally based on their geographical locations within the United States. Based on the similar economic characteristics of each of the operating segments, management believes the Company meets the criteria for aggregating its operations into a single reporting segment.

 

Revenue Recognition—The Company follows the provisions of Staff Accounting Bulletin (SAB) No. 104, Revenue Recognition in Financial Statements (SAB 104), for revenue recognition. Under SAB 104, four conditions must be met before revenue can be recognized: (i) there is persuasive evidence that an arrangement exists; (ii) delivery has occurred or service has been rendered; (iii) the price is fixed or determinable; and (iv) collection is reasonably assured.

 

The Company’s revenue is derived primarily from providing long-term healthcare services to residents and is recognized on the date services are provided at amounts billable to individual residents. For residents under reimbursement arrangements with third-party payors, including Medicaid, Medicare and private insurers, revenue is recorded based on contractually agreed-upon amounts on a per patient, daily basis.

 

Revenue from the Medicare and Medicaid programs accounted for approximately 74% of the Company’s revenue in each of the periods in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007 and 2006. The Company records revenue from these governmental and managed care programs as services are performed at their expected net realizable amounts under these programs. The Company’s revenue from governmental and managed care programs is subject to audit and retroactive adjustment by governmental and third-party agencies. Consistent with healthcare industry accounting practices, any changes to these governmental revenue estimates are recorded in the period the change or adjustment becomes known based on final settlements. The Company recorded retroactive adjustments that increased revenue by $80 and $848 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007, respectively, and $25 and $216 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2006, respectively. Also, see Note 13 for further discussion. The Company records revenue from private pay patients as services are performed.

 

Accounts ReceivableAccounts receivable consist primarily of amounts due from Medicare and Medicaid programs, other government programs, managed care health plans and private payor sources. Estimated provisions for doubtful accounts are recorded to the extent it is probable that a portion or all of a particular account will not be collected.

 

In evaluating the collectibility of accounts receivable, the Company considers a number of factors, including the age of the accounts, changes in collection patterns, the composition of patient accounts by payor type and the status of ongoing disputes with third-party payors. The percentages applied to the aged receivable balances are based on the Company’s historical experience and time limits, if any, for managed care, Medicare and Medicaid. The Company periodically refines its procedures for estimating the allowance for doubtful accounts based on experience with the estimation process and changes in circumstances.

 

6



 

Self-InsuranceThe Company is partially self-insured for general and professional liability up to a base amount per claim (the self-insured retention) with an aggregate, one time deductible above this limit. Losses beyond these amounts are insured through third-party policies with coverage limits per occurrence, per location and on an aggregate basis for the Company. For claims made in 2007, the self-insured retention was $350 per claim with a $900 deductible. The third-party coverage above these limits for all periods presented was $1,000 per occurrence, $3,000 per facility with a $6,000 blanket aggregate.

 

The self-insured retention and deductible limits for general and professional liability and worker’s compensation are self-insured through a wholly-owned insurance captive (the Captive), the related assets and liabilities of which are included in the accompanying consolidated financial statements. The Captive is subject to certain statutory requirements as an insurance provider. These requirements include, but are not limited to, maintaining statutory capital. The Company’s policy is to accrue amounts equal to the estimated costs to settle open claims of insureds, as well as an estimate of the cost of insured claims that have been incurred but not reported. The Company develops information about the size of the ultimate claims based on historical experience, current industry information and actuarial analysis, and has evaluated the estimates for claim loss exposure on an annual basis through 2006, and on a quarterly basis beginning with the first quarter of 2007. Accrued general liability and professional malpractice liabilities recorded on an undiscounted basis in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets were $18,831 and $16,013 as of September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively.

 

The Company’s operating subsidiaries are self-insured for workers’ compensation liability in California.   In Texas, the operating subsidiaries have elected non-subscriber status for workers’ compensation claims. The Company’s operating subsidiaries in other states have third party guaranteed cost coverage. In California and Texas, the Company accrues amounts equal to the estimated costs to settle open claims, as well as an estimate of the cost of claims that have been incurred but not reported. The Company uses actuarial valuations to estimate the liability based on historical experience and industry information. Accrued workers’ compensation liabilities are recorded on an undiscounted basis in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets and were $4,379 and $4,504 as of September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively.

 

During 2003 and 2004, the Company’s California and Arizona operating subsidiaries were insured for workers’ compensation liability by a third-party carrier under a policy where the retrospective premium was adjusted annually based on incurred developed losses and allocated expenses. Based on a comparison of the computed retrospective premium to the actual payments funded, amounts will be due to the insurer or insured. The funded accrual in excess of the estimated liabilities is included in prepaid expenses and other current assets in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets and was $903 and $930 as of September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively.

 

Effective May 1, 2006, the Company began to provide self-insured medical (including prescription drugs) and dental healthcare benefits to the majority of its employees. Prior to this, the Company had multiple third-party HMO and PPO plans, of which certain HMO plans are still active. The Company is not aware of any run-off claim liabilities from the prior plans. The Company is fully liable for all financial and legal aspects of these benefit plans. To protect itself against loss exposure with this policy, the Company has purchased individual stop-loss insurance coverage that insures individual claims that exceed $100 for each covered person which resets every plan year or a maximum of $6,000 per each covered person’s lifetime on the PPO plan and unlimited on the HMO plan. The Company has also purchased aggregate stop-loss coverage that reimburses the plan up to $5,000 to the extent that paid claims exceed $7,225. The aforementioned coverage only applies to claims paid during the plan year. The Company’s accrued liability under these plans recorded on an undiscounted basis in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets was $1,755 and $989 at September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively.

 

The Company believes that adequate provision has been made in the consolidated financial statements for liabilities that may arise out of patient care, workers’ compensation, healthcare benefits and related services provided to date. The amount of the Company’s reserves was determined based on an estimation process that uses information obtained from both company-specific and industry data. This estimation process requires the Company to continuously monitor and evaluate the life cycle of the claims. Using data obtained from this monitoring and the Company’s assumptions about emerging trends, the Company, with the assistance of an independent actuary, develops information about the size of ultimate claims based on the Company’s historical experience and other available industry information. The most significant assumptions used in the estimation process include determining the trend in costs, the expected cost of claims incurred but not reported and the expected costs to settle or pay damage awards with respect to unpaid claims. It is possible, however, that the actual liabilities may exceed the Company’s estimate of loss.

 

7



 

The self-insured liabilities are based upon estimates, and while management believes that the estimates of loss are reasonable, the ultimate liability may be in excess of or less than the recorded amounts. Due to the inherent volatility of actuarially determined loss estimates, it is reasonably possible that the Company could experience changes in estimated losses that could be material to net income. If the Company’s actual liability exceeds its estimate of loss, its future earnings and financial condition would be adversely affected.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets—The Company’s management reviews the carrying value of long-lived assets that are held and used in the Company’s operations for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability of these assets is determined based upon expected undiscounted future net cash flows from the operations to which the assets relate, utilizing management’s best estimate, appropriate assumptions, and projections at the time. If the carrying value is determined to be unrecoverable from future operating cash flows, the asset is deemed impaired and an impairment loss would be recognized to the extent the carrying value exceeded the estimated fair value of the asset. The Company estimates the fair value of assets based on the estimated future discounted cash flows of the asset. The Company’s management has evaluated its long-lived assets and has not identified any impairment as of September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006.

 

Intangible Assets and Goodwill—Intangible assets consist primarily of deferred financing costs, lease acquisition costs and trade names. Deferred financing costs are amortized over the term of the related debt, ranging from seven to 26 years. Lease acquisition costs are amortized over the life of the lease of the facility acquired, ranging from ten to 20 years. Trade names are amortized over 30 years.

 

Goodwill is accounted for under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 141, Business Combinations (SFAS 141) and represents the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of identifiable net assets acquired in business combinations. In accordance with SFAS No. 142, Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets (SFAS 142), goodwill is subject to annual testing for impairment. In addition, goodwill is tested for impairment if events occur or circumstances change that would reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying amount. The Company performs its annual test for impairment during the fourth quarter of each year. The Company did not record any impairment charges during the nine months ended September 30, 2007 or in 2006.

 

Stock-Based Compensation—As of January 1, 2006, the Company adopted SFAS No. 123(R), Share-Based Payment (SFAS 123(R)), which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense for all share-based payment awards made to employees and directors including employee stock options based on estimated fair values, ratably over the requisite service period of the award. Net income will be reduced as a result of the recognition of the fair value of all stock options issued on and subsequent to January 1, 2006, the amount of which is contingent upon the number of future options granted and other variables. Prior to the adoption of SFAS 123(R), the Company accounted for stock-based awards to employees and directors using the intrinsic value method in accordance with Accounting Principles Board (APB) Opinion No. 25, Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees (APB 25) as allowed under SFAS No. 123, Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation (SFAS 123).

 

The Company adopted SFAS 123(R) using the prospective transition method. The Company’s consolidated financial statements as of and for the periods ended September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006 reflect the impact of SFAS 123(R). In accordance with the prospective transition method, the Company’s consolidated financial statements for periods prior to January 1, 2006 have not been restated to reflect, and do not include, the impact of SFAS 123(R).

 

Historically, no compensation expense was recognized by the Company in its financial statements in connection with the awarding of stock option grants to employees provided that, as of the grant date, all terms associated with the award were fixed and the fair value of its stock, as of the grant date, was equal to or less than the amount an employee must pay to acquire the stock. The Company would have recognized compensation expense in situations where the fair value of its common stock on the grant date was greater than the amount an employee must pay to acquire the stock. Stock-based compensation expense recognized in the Company’s consolidated statement of income for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007 does not include compensation expense for share-based payment awards granted prior to, but not yet vested as of January 1, 2006, in accordance with the pro forma provisions of SFAS 123, but does include compensation expense for the share-based payment awards granted subsequent to January 1, 2006 based on the fair value on the grant date estimated in accordance with the provisions of SFAS 123(R). Existing options at January 1, 2006 will continue to be accounted for in accordance with APB 25 unless such options are modified, repurchased or canceled after the effective date.

 

8



 

Income Taxes—Income taxes are accounted for in accordance with SFAS No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes (SFAS 109). Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are established for temporary differences between the financial reporting basis and the tax basis of the Company’s assets and liabilities at tax rates expected to be in effect when such temporary differences are expected to reverse. The temporary differences are primarily attributable to compensation accruals, straight line rent adjustments and reserves for doubtful accounts and insurance liabilities. When necessary, we record a valuation allowance to reduce our net deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. In considering the need for a valuation allowance against some portion or all of our deferred tax assets, we must make certain estimates and assumptions regarding future taxable income, the feasibility of tax planning strategies and other factors.

 

Estimates and judgments regarding deferred tax assets and the associated valuation allowance, if any, are based on, among other things, knowledge of operations, markets, historical trends and likely future changes and, when appropriate, the opinions of advisors with knowledge and expertise in certain fields. However, due to the nature of certain assets and liabilities, there are risks and uncertainties associated with some of our estimates and judgments. Actual results could differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.  The net deferred tax assets as of September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006 were $16,055 and $12,558, respectively. The Company expects to fully utilize these deferred tax assets; however, their ultimate realization is dependent upon the amount of future taxable income during the periods in which the temporary differences become deductible.

 

As of January 1, 2007, the Company adopted FASB Interpretation No. 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes—an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109 (FIN 48).  FIN 48 requires the Company to maintain a liability for underpayment of income taxes and related interest and penalties, if any, for uncertain income tax positions. In considering the need for and magnitude of a liability for uncertain income tax positions, the Company must make certain estimates and assumptions regarding the amount of income tax benefit that will ultimately be realized. The ultimate resolution of an uncertain tax position may not be known for a number of years, during which time the Company may be required to adjust these reserves, in light of changing facts and circumstances.

 

The Company used an estimate of its annual income tax rate to recognize a provision for income taxes in financial statements for interim periods. However, changes in facts and circumstances could result in adjustments to the Company’s effective tax rate in future quarterly or annual periods.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements—In September 2006, the FASB issued SFAS No. 157, Fair Value Measurements (SFAS 157), which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value under GAAP, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. SFAS 157 applies to other accounting pronouncements that require or permit fair value measurements. SFAS 157 is effective for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2007, and for interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company is currently evaluating the impact, if any, that SFAS 157 will have on the consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 159, The Fair Value Option For Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities—including an amendment of FASB Statement No. 115 (SFAS 159). SFAS 159 permits entities to choose to measure many financial instruments and certain other items at fair value. SFAS 159 is effective for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2007. The Company is currently evaluating the impact, if any, that SFAS 159 will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

Adoption of New Accounting Pronouncement—In June 2006, the FASB issued FIN 48, which, clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in financial statements in accordance with SFAS 109 by prescribing a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. FIN 48 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosures, and transition. The Company adopted FIN 48 at the beginning of fiscal year 2007. See Note 10 for a description of the impact of this adoption on the Company’s consolidated financial position and results of operations.

 

9



 

3.             COMPUTATION OF NET INCOME PER COMMON SHARE

 

Basic net income per share is computed by dividing net income attributable to common shares by the weighted average number of outstanding common shares for the period. The computation of diluted net income per share is similar to the computation of basic net income per share except that the denominator is increased to include contingently returnable shares and the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if the dilutive potential common shares had been issued. In addition, in computing the dilutive effect of convertible securities, the numerator is adjusted to add back (a) any convertible preferred dividends and (b) the after-tax amount of interest, if any, recognized in the period associated with any convertible debt.

 

A reconciliation of the numerator and denominator used in the calculation of basic net income per common share follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

Numerator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

4,466

 

$

6,381

 

$

14,298

 

$

17,199

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock dividends

 

(110

)

(82

)

(329

)

(247

)

Net income available to common stockholders for basic net income per share

 

$

4,356

 

$

6,299

 

$

13,969

 

$

16,952

 

Denominator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average shares outstanding for basic net income per share(1)

 

13,506

 

13,312

 

13,463

 

13,356

 

Basic net income per common share

 

$

0.32

 

$

0.47

 

$

1.04

 

$

1.27

 

 


(1)                                 Basic share amounts are shown net of unvested shares subject to the Company’s repurchase right, which total 160 and 444 shares at September 30, 2007 and  2006, respectively.

 

A reconciliation of the numerator and denominator used in the calculation of diluted net income per common share follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

Numerator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

4,466

 

$

6,381

 

$

14,298

 

$

17,199

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Denominator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding

 

13,506

 

13,312

 

13,463

 

13,356

 

Plus: incremental shares from assumed conversions(1)

 

3,372

 

3,553

 

3,424

 

3,413

 

Adjusted weighted average common shares outstanding

 

16,878

 

16,865

 

16,887

 

16,769

 

Diluted net income per common share

 

$

0.26

 

$

0.38

 

$

0.85

 

$

1.03

 

 


(1)                                 Fully diluted share amounts include unvested shares subject to the Company’s repurchase right, which total 160 and 444 shares at September 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively.

 

10



 

4.             REVENUE AND ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

 

Revenue for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively, is summarized in the following tables:

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

Revenue

 

% of Revenue

 

Revenue

 

% of Revenue

 

Revenue

 

% of Revenue

 

Revenue

 

% of Revenue

 

Medicaid

 

$

46,907

 

45.1

%

$

38,633

 

41.8

%

$

133,625

 

44.2

%

$

108,079

 

41.4

%

Medicare

 

30,011

 

28.8

 

30,070

 

32.6

 

89,707

 

29.7

 

86,175

 

33.0

 

Total Medicaid and Medicare

 

76,918

 

73.9

 

68,703

 

74.4

 

223,332

 

73.9

 

194,254

 

74.4

 

Managed care

 

13,100

 

12.6

 

11,472

 

12.4

 

38,807

 

12.8

 

32,559

 

12.5

 

Private and other payors

 

14,074

 

13.5

 

12,163

 

13.2

 

40,200

 

13.3

 

34,252

 

13.1

 

Revenue

 

$

104,092

 

100.0

%

$

92,338

 

100.0

%

$

302,339

 

100.0

%

$

261,065

 

100.0

%

 

Accounts receivable consisted of the following:

 

 

 

September 30, 2007

 

December 31, 2006

 

Medicaid

 

$

20,921

 

$

22,534

 

Managed care

 

14,183

 

12,972

 

Medicare

 

12,749

 

11,974

 

Private and other payors

 

7,368

 

5,348

 

 

 

55,221

 

52,828

 

Less allowance for doubtful accounts

 

(7,582

)

(7,543

)

Accounts receivable

 

$

47,639

 

$

45,285

 

 

5.             ACQUISITIONS

 

The Company’s acquisition policy is to purchase and lease facilities to complement the Company’s existing portfolio of long-term care facilities. The operations of all the Company’s facilities are included in the accompanying consolidated financial statements subsequent to the date of acquisition. Acquisitions are typically paid in cash and are accounted for using the purchase method of accounting in accordance with SFAS 141. Where the Company enters into facility operating lease agreements, the Company typically does not pay any material amount to the prior facility operator nor does the Company acquire any assets or assume any liabilities, other than rights and obligations under the operating lease and operations transfer agreement, as part of the transaction. Some operating leases include options to purchase the facilities. As a result, from time to time, the Company will acquire facilities that the Company has been operating under third-party leases.

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2007, the Company acquired four facilities.  The aggregate purchase price of three of the four acquisitions was $9,452, which was entirely paid in cash.  The Company acquired the other facility pursuant to a long-term operating lease arrangement between the Company and the real property owner of the facility at prevailing fair market lease rates.  In this transaction, the Company assumed ownership of the skilled nursing operating business at this facility for no material monetary consideration. The facilities acquired during the nine-months ended September 30, 2007 are as follows:

 

·                  In February 2007, the Company purchased a skilled nursing facility in Salt Lake City, Utah, adding an additional 120 licensed beds(1);

 

·                  In March 2007, the Company purchased a skilled nursing facility in Lewisville, Texas adding an additional 120 licensed beds(1);

 


(1)                                 All bed counts are licensed beds and may not reflect the number of beds actually available for patient use.

11



 

·                  In March 2007, the Company purchased a skilled nursing facility in Mesquite, Texas adding an additional 162 licensed beds(1); and

 

·                  In July 2007, the Company entered into an operating lease and assumed the operations of a skilled nursing facility which is also licensed for assisted living services, in Draper, Utah adding an additional 106 beds.(1)  No additional material consideration was paid and the Company did not purchase any assets or assume any liabilities, other than the Company’s rights and obligations under the operating lease and operations transfer agreement, as part of this transaction.  The Company also simultaneously entered into a separate contract with the property owner to purchase the underlying property for $3,000, pending the property owner’s resolution of certain boundary line issues with neighboring property owners.  As of September 30, 2007, these boundary line issues were not yet resolved.

 


(1)                                 All bed counts are licensed beds and may not reflect the number of beds actually available for patient use.

 

Goodwill recognized in these transactions amounted to $810, which is expected to be fully deductible for tax purposes. The Company recognized $33 in other intangible assets.

 

Additionally, during the nine months ended September 30, 2007, the Company purchased the underlying assets of one facility that it was operating under a long-term lease arrangement.  This facility was purchased for $3,355, which was entirely paid in cash.  The cash outflow related to this purchase is included in the purchase of property and equipment under cash flows from investing activities in the consolidated statements of cash flows.

 

The purchase prices in the above transactions were allocated to real property, equipment, intangible assets and goodwill based on the following valuation techniques:

 

·                  The fair value of land, buildings and improvements and equipment, furniture and fixtures (or tangible assets) was determined utilizing a cost approach.  In the cost approach, the subject property is valued based upon the fair value of the land, as if vacant, by comparing recent sales or asking prices for similar land, to which the depreciated replacement cost of the building and improvements and equipment is added.  The replacement cost of the building and improvements and equipment is adjusted for accrued depreciation resulting from physical deterioration, functional obsolescence and external or economic obsolescence.

 

·                  The customer base was valued under an income capitalization approach using an excess earnings method. Excess earnings are the earnings remaining after deducting the market rates of return on the estimated values of contributory assets including debt-free net working capital, tangible and intangible assets. The excess earnings are thereby calculated and discounted to a present value. The primary components of this method consist of the determination of excess earnings and an appropriate rate of return. To arrive at the excess earnings attributable to an intangible asset, earnings after taxes derived from that asset are projected. Thereafter, the returns on contributory debt-free net working capital, tangible and intangible assets are deducted from the earnings projections. After deducting returns on these contributory assets, the remaining earnings are attributable to the customer base. These remaining, or excess, earnings are then discounted to a present value utilizing an appropriate discount rate for the asset.

 

·                  Goodwill is calculated as the value that remains after subtracting the net asset value and the value of identifiable tangible and intangible assets and liabilities for the respective purchase.

 

12



 

The table below presents the allocation of the purchase price for the facilities acquired as noted above:

 

 

 

September 30,
2007

 

 

 

 

Land

 

$

2,391

 

Building and improvements

 

5,675

 

Equipment, furniture, and fixtures

 

543

 

Goodwill

 

810

 

Tradename and customer base intangible

 

33

 

 

 

$

9,452

 

 

The Company’s acquisition strategy has been focused on identifying both opportunistic and strategic acquisitions within its target markets that offer superior opportunities for return on invested capital. The facilities acquired by the Company are frequently underperforming financially and can have regulatory and clinical challenges to overcome. Financial information, especially with underperforming facilities, is often inadequate, inaccurate or unavailable. Consequently, the Company believes that prior operating results are not meaningful and may be misleading as the information is not representative of the Company’s current operating results or indicative of the integration potential of its newly acquired facilities.

 

The four businesses acquired during the nine months ended September 30, 2007 were not material acquisitions to the Company, individually or in the aggregate.  These acquisitions have been included in the September 30, 2007 condensed consolidated balance sheet of the Company and the operating results have been included in the condensed consolidated statement of income of the Company since the date the Company gained effective control.  In addition to the four businesses acquired during the nine months ended September 30, 2007, a fifth facility that was previously leased by the Company was purchased from the landlord and the lease was terminated.  Therefore, the assets acquired have been included in the September 30, 2007 condensed consolidated balance sheet and the operating results have been included in the condensed consolidated statement of income since the inception of the lease.  Accordingly, pro forma financial information is not presented for the nine months ended September 30, 2007.

 

On December 11, 2007, the Company completed an asset purchase agreement to purchase two skilled nursing facilities in California and one assisted living facility in Arizona, which also provides independent living services, for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $12,800.  Prior to the purchase, the Company operated these three facilities under a single master lease agreement. The master lease agreement included purchase options for the two skilled nursing facilities, which were not exercisable at the time of purchase.  Purchasing these leased facilities resulted in no net change in the Company’s total number of beds.

 

6.             PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property and equipment are initially recorded at their original historical cost. Repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the depreciable assets (ranging from 3 to 30 years). Leasehold improvements are amortized on a straight-line basis over the shorter of their estimated useful lives or the remaining lease term.

 

13



 

Property and equipment consist of the following:

 

 

 

September 30, 2007

 

December 31, 2006

 

Land

 

$

21,870

 

$

17,265

 

Buildings and improvements

 

67,893

 

57,062

 

Equipment

 

15,356

 

11,818

 

Furniture and fixtures

 

5,962

 

3,761

 

Leasehold improvements

 

10,669

 

7,363

 

 

 

121,750

 

97,269

 

Less accumulated depreciation

 

(14,832

)

(10,136

)

Property and equipment, net

 

$

106,918

 

$

87,133

 

 

7.             INTANGIBLE ASSETS—Net

 

 

 

September 30, 2007

 

December 31, 2006

 

Intangible Assets

 

Weighted
Average
Life
(Years)

 

Gross
Carrying
Amount

 

Accumulated
Amortization

 

Net

 

Gross
Carrying
Amount

 

Accumulated
Amortization

 

Net

 

Debt issuance costs

 

9.3

 

$

1,807

 

$

(635

)

$

1,172

 

$

1,744

 

$

(504

)

$

1,240

 

Lease acquisition costs

 

15.5

 

1,071

 

(465

)

606

 

1,063

 

(398

)

665

 

Customer base

 

0.3

 

213

 

(210

)

3

 

180

 

(136

)

44

 

Tradename

 

30.0

 

733

 

(43

)

690

 

733

 

(23

)

710

 

Total

 

 

 

$

3,824

 

$

(1,353

)

$

2,471

 

$

3,720

 

$

(1,061

)

$

2,659

 

 

Amortization expense was $92 and $292 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007, respectively, and $109 and $330 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2006, respectively.

 

8.             RESTRICTED AND OTHER ASSETS

 

Restricted and other assets consist primarily of capital reserves and deposits. Capital reserves are maintained as part of the mortgage agreements of the Company and certain of its landlords with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. These capital reserves are restricted for capital improvements and repairs to the related facilities.

 

Restricted and other assets consist of the following:

 

 

 

September 30, 2007

 

December 31, 2006

 

Deposits with landlords

 

$

1,001

 

$

1,001

 

Capital improvement reserves with landlords and lenders

 

2,063

 

1,562

 

Other

 

19

 

55

 

 

 

$

3,083

 

$

2,618

 

 

 

14



 

9.             OTHER ACCRUED LIABILITIES

 

Other accrued liabilities consist of the following:

 

 

 

September 30, 2007

 

December 31, 2006

 

Quality assurance fee

 

$

1,857

 

$

1,863

 

Resident refunds payable

 

1,640

 

1,736

 

Deferred resident revenue

 

1,735

 

1,370

 

Cash held in trust for residents

 

1,123

 

1,070

 

Claim settlement

 

 

1,000

 

Dividends payable

 

658

 

657

 

Income taxes payable

 

259

 

1,885

 

Property taxes

 

952

 

638

 

Other

 

3,660

 

1,887

 

Other accrued liabilities

 

$

11,884

 

$

12,106

 

 

Quality assurance fee represents amounts payable to the State of California in respect of a mandated fee based on resident days. Resident refunds payable includes amounts due to residents for overpayments and duplicate payments. Deferred resident revenue occurs when the Company receives payments in advance of services provided. Cash held in trust for residents reflects monies received from, or on behalf of, residents. Maintaining a trust account for residents is a regulatory requirement and, while the trust assets offset the liability, the Company assumes a fiduciary responsibility for these funds. The cash balance related to this liability is included in other current assets in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

10.          INCOME TAXES

 

The provision for income taxes for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007 and 2006 is summarized as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

Current:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Federal

 

$

3,896

 

$

2,800

 

$

10,534

 

$

9,381

 

State

 

701

 

112

 

1,944

 

1,570

 

 

 

4,597

 

2,912

 

12,478

 

10,951

 

Deferred:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Federal

 

(1,624

)

696

 

(2,824

)

(21

)

State

 

(469

)

(128

)

(626

)

(369

)

 

 

(2,093

)

568

 

(3,450

)

(390

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income, gross of related tax effects

 

(57

)

 

(75

)

 

Interest expense, gross of related tax effects

 

 

 

94

 

 

Total

 

$

2,447

 

$

3,480

 

$

9,047

 

$

10,561

 

 

15



 

The Company’s deferred tax assets and liabilities as of September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006 are summarized as follows:

 

 

 

September 30, 2007

 

December 31, 2006

 

Deferred tax assets (liabilities):

 

 

 

 

 

Accrued expenses

 

$

13,338

 

$

9,563

 

Allowance for doubtful accounts

 

3,234

 

3,228

 

State taxes

 

 

235

 

Tax credits

 

1,016

 

622

 

Total deferred tax assets

 

17,588

 

13,648

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State taxes

 

(355

)

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

(336

)

(413

)

Prepaid expenses

 

(842

)

(677

)

Total deferred tax liabilities

 

(1,533

)

(1,090

)

Net deferred tax assets

 

$

16,055

 

$

12,558

 

 

The Company adopted FIN 48 effective January 1, 2007 and, as of the date of adoption, had a total amount of unrecognized tax benefits of $217. This total consists of $487 of accrued interest and unrecognized tax benefits for permanent differences (as defined by SFAS 109), net of $270 of unrecognized tax detriments from temporary differences (as defined by SFAS 109), which resulted in additional deferred tax liability. As of January 1, 2007, the Company recorded $340 as an adjustment, net of the associated tax impact on interest amounts, to opening retained earnings as a result of the adoption of FIN 48. This amount, if recognized, would affect the Company’s effective tax rate. The Company’s net FIN 48 tax liability as of January 1, 2007 was $87.

 

The Company has historically classified interest and/or penalties on income tax liabilities or refunds as additional income tax expense or income and will continue to do so after the adoption of FIN 48. As of January 1, 2007, the total amount of accrued interest and penalties, net of associated tax benefit, in the Company’s statement of financial position was $152. The Company accrued an additional amount of interest and penalties equal to $46 in the first half of 2007.  The Company reversed approximately $34 of the accrued interest and penalties, net of associated tax benefit, in the third quarter, primarily as a result of the closure of the Federal statute of limitations on the Company’s 2003 income tax year.

 

As of January 1, 2007, the Company was under examination by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for the 2004 and 2005 income tax years and by a major state tax jurisdiction for the 2003 and 2004 income tax years. The Company settled with the IRS on all outstanding requests for a net refund of tax during the first quarter 2007. The impact of this settlement on the Company’s unrecognized tax benefit was a net increase of approximately $200.

 

The Federal statute of limitations on the Company’s 2003 income tax year generally lapsed in the third quarter of 2007, which resulted in a reduction in unrecognized tax benefits by approximately $38 for uncertain tax positions.  The closure also decreased unrecognized tax benefits for accrued interest, as mentioned above.

 

The Federal statute of limitations on the Company’s 2004 income tax year will close in the third quarter of 2008.  The Company does not believe this closure will significantly impact unrecognized tax benefits or detriments of any uncertain tax position.

 

11.          Debt

 

The Company has an Amended and Restated Loan and Security Agreement, as amended (the Revolver) with General Electric Capital Corporation (the Lender) under which the Company may borrow up to the lesser of $20,000 or 85% of qualified accounts receivable, as defined. Revolver borrowings bear interest at an annual rate of prime plus 1%. The Revolver contains typical representations and covenants for a loan of this type. A violation of any of these covenants could result in a default under the Revolver, which would result in all amounts owed by the Company, including possibly amounts due under the Third Amended and Restated Loan Agreement (the Term Loan) with the Lender discussed below, to become immediately due and payable upon receipt of notice. The Company was in compliance with all covenants as of September 30, 2007. At September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, there were no outstanding borrowings under the Revolver and $8,449 of borrowing capacity was pledged to secure outstanding letters of credit in the same periods. The Revolver was set to mature in March 2007 but has been extended until February 22, 2008.  On September 13, 2007, the Company negotiated a temporary increase in the maximum amount available under the Revolver from $20,000 to $25,000.  This temporary increase was available through mid-November 2007.

 

16



 

On October 3, 2007, the Company secured a written commitment (the Commitment Letter) from the Lender to amend and increase the Revolver by extending the term to 2012, increasing the available credit thereunder up to the lesser of $50,000 or 85% of the eligible accounts receivable, and changing the interest rate to either, as the Company may elect from time to time, (i) the 1, 2, 3 or 6 month LIBOR (at the Company’s option) plus 2.5%, or (ii) the greater of (a) prime plus 1.0% or (b) the federal funds rate plus 1.5%. The Commitment Letter is contingent on final approval of the Lender’s credit committee and the negotiation, execution and delivery of appropriate amendatory documentation, as well as other conditions precedent which are customary for financings of this type and the absence of any material adverse change to the Company’s business or financial condition at the time of closing. Therefore, the Company cannot assure that it will be able to extend the Revolver. The Revolver contains typical representations and covenants for a loan of this type, a violation of which could result in a default under the Revolver and could possibly cause all amounts owed by the Company, including amounts due under the Term Loan, to be declared immediately due and payable.

 

Long-term debt consists of the following:

 

 

 

September 30,
2007

 

December 31,
2006

 

Term Loan with the Lender, multiple-advance term loan, principal and interest payable monthly; interest is fixed at time of draw at 10-year Treasury Note rate plus 2.25% (rates in effect at December 31, 2006 range from 6.95% to 7.50%), balance due June 2016, collateralized by deeds of trust on real property, assignments of rents, security agreements and fixture financing statements.

 

$

55,132

 

$

55,653

 

Mortgage note, principal, and interest of $54,378 payable monthly and continuing through February 2027, interest at fixed rate of 7.5%, collateralized by deed of trust on real property, assignment of rents and security agreement

 

6,651

 

6,774

 

Mortgage note, principal, and interest of $18,449 payable monthly and continuing through September 2008, interest at fixed rate of 7.49%, collateralized by a deed of trust and security agreement and an assignment of rents

 

2,046

 

2,094

 

Notes payable, principal and interest payable monthly at fixed rate of 6.9%, balance due November 2008, collateralized by equipment

 

 

7

 

 

 

63,829

 

64,528

 

Less current maturities

 

(3,004

)

(941

)

 

 

$

60,825

 

$

63,587

 

 

Under the Term Loan, the Company is subject to standard reporting requirements and other typical covenants for a loan of this type. Effective October 1, 2006 and continuing each calendar quarter thereafter, the Company is subject to restrictive financial covenants, including average occupancy, Debt Service (as defined in the agreement) and Project Yield (as defined in the agreement). As of September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, the Company was in compliance with such loan covenants.

 

The carrying value of the Company’s long-term debt is considered to approximate the fair value of such debt for all periods presented based upon the interest rates that the Company believes it can currently obtain for similar debt.

 

12.          OPTIONS AND WARRANTS

 

Stock-based compensation expense recognized under SFAS 123(R) consists of share-based payment awards made to employees and directors including employee stock options based on estimated fair values. Stock-based compensation expense recognized in the Company’s condensed consolidated statements of income for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007 and 2006 does not include compensation expense for share-based payment awards granted prior to, but not yet vested as of January 1, 2006, in accordance with the provisions of SFAS 123 but does include compensation expense for the share-based payment awards granted on or subsequent to January 1, 2006 based on the grant date fair value estimated in accordance with the adoption provisions of SFAS 123(R). As stock-based compensation expense recognized in the

 

17



 

Company’s condensed consolidated statements of income for the three and nine month periods ended September 30, 2007 and 2006 was based on awards ultimately expected to vest, it has been reduced for estimated forfeitures. SFAS 123(R) requires forfeitures to be estimated at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates.

 

The Company has three option plans, all of which have been approved by the stockholders. In the 2001 Plan and 2005 Plan, options may be exercised for unvested shares of common stock, which have full stockholder rights including voting, dividend and liquidation rights. The Company retains the right to repurchase any or all unvested shares at the exercise price paid per share of any or all unvested shares should the optionee cease to remain in service while holding such unvested shares.

 

2001 Stock Option, Deferred Stock and Restricted Stock Plan—The 2001 Stock Option, Deferred Stock and Restricted Stock Plan (2001 Plan) authorizes the sale of up to 1,980 shares of common stock to officers, employees, directors, and consultants of the Company. Granted non-employee director options vest and become exercisable immediately. Generally, all other granted options and restricted stock vest over five years at 20% per year on the anniversary of the grant date. Options expire ten years from the date of grant. The exercise price of the stock is determined by the Board of Directors, but shall not be less than 100% of the fair value on the date of grant. Shares issued upon early exercise of options granted prior to 2006 vested in full upon the consummation of the Company’s IPO or if such options had not been exercised before the consummation of the Company’s IPO, such shares will vest in full upon exercise. At September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, there were 242 and 257, respectively, unissued shares of common stock available for issuance under this plan, including shares that have been forfeited and are available for reissue.

 

2005 Stock Incentive Plan—The 2005 Stock Incentive Plan (2005 Plan) authorizes the sale of up to 1,000 shares of treasury stock of which only 800 shares were repurchased and therefore eligible for reissuance as of September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, to officers, employees, directors, and consultants of the Company. Options granted to non-employee directors vest and become exercisable immediately. All other granted options vest over five years at 20% per year on the anniversary of the grant date. Options expire ten years from the date of grant. At September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, there were 108 and 6, respectively, unissued shares of common stock available for issuance under this plan, including shares that have been forfeited and are available for reissue.

 

2007 Omnibus Incentive Plan — The 2007 Omnibus Incentive Plan (2007 Plan) authorizes the sale of up to 1,000 shares of common stock to officers, employees, directors and consultants of the Company.  In addition, the number of shares of common stock reserved under the 2007 Plan will automatically increase on the first day of each fiscal year, beginning on January 1, 2008, in an amount equal to the lesser of (i) 1,000 shares of common stock, or (ii) 2% of the number of shares outstanding as of the last day of the immediately preceding fiscal year, or (iii) such lesser number as determined by the Company’s board of directors.  Granted non-employee director options vest and become exercisable in three equal annual installments, or the length of the term if less than three years, on the completion of each year of service measured from the grant date.  All other granted options vest over five years at 20% per year on the anniversary of the grant date. Options expire ten years from the date of grant.  At September 30, 2007, there were 1,000 unissued shares of common stock available for issuance under this plan.

 

The Company uses the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to recognize the value of stock-based compensation expense for all share-based payment awards. Determining the appropriate fair-value model and calculating the fair value of stock-based awards at the grant date requires considerable judgment, including estimating stock price volatility, expected option life and forfeiture rates. The Company develops estimates based on historical data and market information, which can change significantly over time. The Black-Scholes model required the Company to make several key judgments including:

 

·                  The expected option term reflects the application of the simplified method set out in SAB No. 107 Share-Based Payment (SAB 107), which was issued in March 2005. Accordingly, the Company has utilized the average of the contractual term of the options and the weighted average vesting period for all options to calculate the expected option term.

 

·                  Estimated volatility also reflects the application of SAB 107 interpretive guidance and, accordingly, incorporates historical volatility of similar public entities until sufficient information regarding the volatility of the Company’s share price becomes available.

 

18



 

·                  The dividend yield is based on the Company’s historical pattern of dividends as well as expected dividend patterns.

 

·                  The risk-free rate is based on the implied yield of U.S. Treasury notes as of the grant date with a remaining term approximately equal to the expected term.

 

·                  Estimated forfeiture rate of approximately 8% per year is based on its historical forfeiture activity of unvested stock options.

 

No options were granted during the nine-month period ended September 30, 2007.

 

As of December 31, 2004, 2005 and 2006, the Company valued its common stock using a combination of weighted income and market valuation approaches. The income approach was based on discounted cash flows. The market approach employed both a guideline company method and merger and acquisition method.

 

The following table represents the employee stock option activity during the nine-months ended September 30, 2007:

 

 

 

Number of
Shares
Outstanding

 

Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price

 

Number of
Shares
Vested

 

Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price

 

December 31, 2006

 

1,244

 

$

6.17

 

148

 

$

3.82

 

Granted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeitures

 

(164

)

$

5.98

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

(15

)

$

6.05

 

 

 

 

 

September 30, 2007

 

1,065

 

$

6.20

 

264

 

$

5.46

 

 

The following summary information reflects stock options outstanding, vesting and related details as of September 30, 2007:

 

 

 

Stock Outstanding

 

Stock Vested

 

Year of Grant

 

Number
Outstanding

 

Exercise
Price

 

Black-
Scholes Fair
Value

 

Remaining
Contractual
Life (Years)

 

Number
Vested and
Exercisable

 

Exercise
Price

 

2003

 

50

 

$0.67-0.81

 

$

38

 

6

 

30

 

$0.67-0.81

 

2004

 

83

 

$1.96-2.46

 

191

 

7

 

40

 

$1.96-2.46

 

2005

 

338

 

$4.99-5.75

 

1,924

 

8

 

68

 

$4.99-5.75

 

2006

 

594

 

$7.05-7.50

 

5,630

 

9

 

126

 

$7.05

 

Total

 

1,065

 

 

 

$

7,783

 

 

 

264

 

 

 

 

The Company recognized $704 and $1,207 in compensation expense during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007 and $183 and $187 during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2006. The Company expects to recognize $250 and $468 and $65 and $71, respectively, in tax benefits when the options vest and are exercised. As of September 30, 2007 and 2006, the total fair value of shares vested was approximately $1,695 and $198, respectively.

 

In future periods, the Company expects to recognize approximately $3,893 in stock-based compensation expense over the next 3.4 weighted average years for unvested options that were outstanding as of September 30, 2007.

 

There were 801 unvested and outstanding options at September 30, 2007, of which 646 are expected to vest. The weighted average contractual life for options vested at September 30, 2007 was 8 years.

 

The aggregate intrinsic value of options outstanding, expected to vest, vested and exercised as of September 30, 2007 was approximately $12,268, $7,302, $3,236 and $3,187, respectively.  The aggregate intrinsic value of options outstanding, expected to vest, vested and exercised as of December 31, 2006 was approximately $13,659, $9,107, $1,978 and $2,691, respectively.  The intrinsic value is calculated as the difference between the market value and the exercise price of the options.

 

19



 

13.          COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Leases—The Company leases certain facilities and its administrative offices under non-cancelable operating leases, most of which have initial lease terms ranging from 5 to 20 years. The Company also leases certain of its equipment under non-cancelable operating leases with initial terms ranging from three to five years. Most of these leases contain renewal options, certain of which involve rent increases. Total rent expense, inclusive of straight-line rent adjustments, was $4,252 and $12,733 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007, respectively, and $4,244 and $12,482 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2006, respectively.

 

Nine of the Company’s facilities are operated under master lease arrangements and a breach at a single facility could subject multiple facilities covered by the same master lease to the same default risk.  Under a master lease, the Company may lease a large number of geographically dispersed properties through an indivisible lease. Failure to comply with Medicare or Medicaid provider requirements is a default under several of the Company’s master lease and debt financing instruments. In addition, other potential defaults related to an individual facility may cause a default of an entire master lease portfolio and could trigger cross-default provisions in the Company’s outstanding debt arrangements and other leases. With an indivisible lease, it is difficult to restructure the composition of the portfolio or economic terms of the lease without the consent of the landlord. Moreover, the Company’s equity interests in four of its subsidiaries, including three of its operating companies, which operate three facilities held under a master lease arrangement with one of the Company’s landlords, have been pledged to the landlord as additional security for its obligations under the master lease arrangement.  In addition, a number of the Company’s individual facility leases are held by the same or related landlords, and some of these leases include cross-default provisions that could cause a default at one facility to trigger a technical default with respect to others, potentially subjecting certain leases and facilities to the various remedies available to the landlords under separate but cross-defaulted leases.

 

On December 11, 2007, the Company completed an agreement to purchase three facilities that it previously operated under a single master lease agreement.  Upon the close of this purchase agreement, the number of facilities at cross-default risk was reduced to six.  See further discussion of this purchase at Note 5.

 

Regulatory Matters—Laws and regulations governing Medicare and Medicaid programs are complex and subject to interpretation. Compliance with such laws and regulations can be subject to future governmental review and interpretation, as well as significant regulatory action including fines, penalties, and exclusion from certain governmental programs. The Company believes that it is in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations.

 

A significant portion of the Company’s revenue is derived from Medicaid and Medicare, for which reimbursement rates are subject to regulatory changes and government funding restrictions. Although the Company is not aware of any significant future rate changes, significant changes to the reimbursement rates could have a material effect on the Company’s operations.

 

Cost-Containment Measures—Both government and private pay sources have instituted cost-containment measures designed to limit payments made to providers of healthcare services, and there can be no assurance that future measures designed to limit payments made to providers will not adversely affect the Company.

 

Indemnities—From time to time, the Company enters into certain types of contracts that contingently require the Company to indemnify parties against third-party claims. These contracts primarily include (i) certain real estate leases, under which the Company may be required to indemnify property owners or prior facility operators for post-transfer environmental or other liabilities and other claims arising from the Company’s use of the applicable premises, (ii) operations transfer agreements, in which the Company agrees to indemnify past operators of facilities the Company acquires against certain liabilities arising from the transfer of the operation and/or the operation thereof after the transfer, (iii) certain lending agreements, under which the Company may be required to indemnify the lender against various claims and liabilities, (iv) agreements with certain lenders under which the Company may be required to indemnify such lenders against various claims and liabilities, and (v) certain agreements with the Company’s officers, directors and employees, under which the Company may be required to indemnify such persons for liabilities arising out of their employment relationships. The terms of such obligations vary by contract and, in most instances, a specific or maximum dollar amount is not explicitly stated therein. Generally, amounts under these contracts cannot be reasonably estimated until a specific claim is asserted. Consequently, because no claims have been asserted, no liabilities have been recorded for these obligations on the Company’s balance sheets for any of the periods presented.

 

20



 

Litigation—The skilled nursing business involves a significant risk of liability given the age and health of the Company’s patients and residents and the services the Company provides. The Company and others in the industry are subject to an increasing number of claims and lawsuits, including professional liability claims, alleging that services have resulted in personal injury, elder abuse, wrongful death or other related claims. The defense of these lawsuits may result in significant legal costs, regardless of the outcome, and can result in large settlement amounts or damage awards.

 

A class action suit was previously filed against the Company alleging, among other things, violations of applicable California Health and Safety Code provisions and a violation of the California Consumer Legal Remedies Act at certain of its facilities. The Company has received court approval for its settlement and the obligation to pay has been capped, not to exceed $3,000. As of December 31, 2006, the Company’s best estimate of the ultimate liability it believes it will likely be subject to after all payments to class claimants and related estimated legal expenses was approximately $1,000. This amount was recorded in accrued other liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2006. The Company settled this class action suit and the settlement was approved by the affected class and the Court in April 2007. The ultimate amount of legal expenses and claims was approximately $1,100, which was paid as of June 30, 2007.

 

In addition to the class action, professional liability and other types of lawsuits and claims described above, the Company is also subject to potential lawsuits under the Federal False Claims Act and comparable state laws alleging submission of fraudulent claims for services to any healthcare program (such as Medicare) or payor. A violation may provide the basis for exclusion from federally-funded healthcare programs. Such exclusions could have a correlative negative impact on the Company’s financial performance. Some states, including California, Arizona and Texas, have enacted similar whistleblower and false claims laws and regulations. In addition, the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 created incentives for states to enact anti-fraud legislation modeled on the Federal False Claims Act. As such, the Company could face increased scrutiny, potential liability and legal expenses and costs based on claims under state false claims acts in markets in which it does business.

 

On June 5, 2006, a complaint was filed against the Company in the Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Los Angeles, purportedly on behalf of the United States, claiming that the Company violated the Medicare Secondary Payer Act. In the complaint, the plaintiff alleged that the Company has inappropriately received and retained reimbursement from Medicare for treatment given to certain unidentified patients and residents of its facilities whose injuries were caused by the Company as a result of unidentified and unadjudicated incidents of medical malpractice. The plaintiff in this action is seeking damages of twice the amount that the Company was allegedly obligated to pay or reimburse to Medicare in connection with the treatment in question under the Medicare Secondary Payer Act, plus interest, together with plaintiff’s costs and fees, including attorneys’ fees. The plaintiff’s case was dismissed in the Company’s favor by the trial court, and the dismissal is currently on appeal.  At this time the loss or possible range of loss is not estimable or probable; accordingly, we have not recorded an accrual for this matter.

 

The Company has been, and continues to be, subject to claims and legal actions that arise in the ordinary course of business including potential claims related to care and treatment provided at its facilities, as well as employment related claims. The Company does not believe that the ultimate resolution of these actions will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial business, financial condition or, results of operations. A significant increase in the number of these claims or an increase in amounts owing under successful claims could materially adversely affect the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Medicare Revenue Recoupments—We are subject to reviews relating to Medicare services, billings and potential overpayments. Recent probe reviews resulted in Medicare revenue recoupment, net of appeal recoveries, to the federal government and related resident copayments of approximately $35 during the nine months ended September 30, 2007. We anticipate that these probe reviews will increase in frequency in the future. In addition, two of our facilities are currently on prepayment review, and others may be placed on prepayment review in the future. If a facility fails prepayment review, the facility could then be subject to undergo targeted review, which is a review that targets perceived claims deficiencies. We have no facilities that are currently undergoing targeted review.

 

Other Matters—In March 2007, the Company and certain of its officers received a series of notices from the Company’s bank indicating that the United States Attorney for the Central District of California had issued an authorized investigative demand, which is similar to a subpoena, to the Company’s bank and then rescinded that demand. This rescinded demand originally requested documents from the Company’s bank related to financial transactions involving the Company, ten of its operating subsidiaries, an outside investor group, and certain of its current and former officers. Subsequently, in June 2007, the U.S. Attorney sent a letter to one of the Company’s current employees requesting a meeting. The letter indicated that the U.S. Attorney and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General were conducting an investigation of claims submitted to the Medicare program for rehabilitation services provided at the Company’s facilities. Although both the Company and the

 

21



 

employee offered to cooperate, the U.S. Attorney later withdrew its meeting request. From these contacts, the Company believed that an investigation was underway, but to date the Company had been unable to determine the exact cause or nature of the U.S. Attorney’s interest in the Company or its subsidiaries, and until recently the Company has been unable to even verify whether the investigation was continuing.

On December 17, 2007, the Company was informed by Deloitte & Touche LLP, the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm, that the U.S. Attorney served a grand jury subpoena on Deloitte & Touche LLP, relating to the Company and several of its operating subsidiaries. The subpoena confirms the Company’s previously reported belief that the U.S. Attorney is conducting an investigation involving certain of the Company’s operating subsidiaries.  To our knowledge, however, neither The Ensign Group, Inc. nor any of its operating subsidiaries or employees has been formally charged with any wrongdoing, served with any related subpoenas or requests, or been directly notified of any concerns or related investigations by the U.S. Attorney or any government agency. While the Company has no reason to believe that the assertion of criminal charges, civil claims, administrative sanctions or whistleblower actions would be warranted, to date the U.S. Attorney’s office has not discussed or provided the Company with any further information with respect to this matter. The Company continues its efforts to meet with the U.S. Attorney to discuss the grand jury subpoena, the Company’s internal investigation described below, and any specific allegations or concerns they may have.  The Company cannot predict or provide any assurance as to the possible outcome of the investigation or any possible related proceedings, or as to the possible outcome of any qui tam litigation that may follow, nor can the Company estimate the possible loss or range of loss that may result from any such proceedings and, therefore, the Company has not recorded any related accruals. To the extent the U.S. Attorney’s office elects to pursue this matter, or if the investigation has been instigated by a qui tam relator who elects to pursue the matter, the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

 

In November 2006, the Company became aware of an allegation of possible reimbursement irregularities at one or more of its facilities. That same month, the Company retained outside counsel and initiated an internal investigation into these matters. Although we expect to conclude this investigation in the near future, in the course of our investigation the Company has identified a limited number of selected Medicare claims for which adequate backup documentation is or may be missing or for which other billing deficiencies exist.  To the extent this missing documentation is not located, the Company intends to refund the full amount of such claims, together with interest, to the Medicare program. Although the Company’s reviews of these claims are not yet complete, to date it appears that a portion of the claims will be refundable, while others are still under review. Consistent with healthcare industry accounting practices, the Company intends to record any charge for refunded payments against revenue in the period in which the claim adjustment becomes known. During the three months ended September 30, 2007, the Company accrued a liability of approximately $241 for selected Medicare claims for which documentation has not been located or for other billing deficiencies identified to date, including interest; however, the Company may record further adjustments connected with these claims in future periods to the extent the final repayment amount is different than the amount recorded, or if additional investigations result in identification and quantification of additional amounts to be refunded. The amount of additional liability, if any, that may result from resolution of this matter cannot be determined; accordingly, no additional amounts have been accrued nor can the Company reasonably estimate the range of possible additional losses, if any, that might result. If the internal or other investigations result in findings of significant billing and reimbursement noncompliance, the Company's business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Concentrations

 

Credit Risk—The Company has significant accounts receivable balances, the collectibility of which is dependent on the availability of funds from certain governmental programs, primarily Medicare and Medicaid. These receivables represent the only significant concentration of credit risk for the Company. The Company does not believe there is significant credit risks associated with these governmental programs. The Company believes that an adequate allowance has been recorded for the possibility of these receivables proving uncollectible, and continually monitors and adjusts these allowances as necessary. The Company’s receivables from Medicare and Medicaid payor programs accounted for approximately 61% and 65% of its total accounts receivable as of September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively. Revenue from reimbursements under the Medicare and Medicaid programs accounted for approximately 74% of the Company’s revenue for each of the periods in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007 and 2006.

 

Cash in Excess of FDIC Limits—The Company currently has bank deposits with a financial institution that exceed FDIC insurance limits. FDIC insurance provides protection for bank deposits up to $100.

 

14.          DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN

 

The Company has a 401(k) defined contribution plan (the 401(k) Plan), whereby eligible employees may contribute up to 15% of their annual basic earnings. Additionally, the 401(k) Plan provides for discretionary matching contributions (as defined) by the Company. The Company contributed, $68 and $200 to the 401(k) Plan during the three and nine months September 30, 2007 and $58 and $171 during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2006, respectively. Beginning in 2007, the Company’s plan allowed eligible employees to contribute up to 90% of their eligible compensation, subject to applicable annual Internal Revenue Code limits.

 

22



 

Item 2.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

You should read the following discussion and analysis in conjunction with our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto contained in Part I, Item 1 of this Report. The information contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q is not a complete description of our business or the risks associated with an investment in our common stock. We urge you to carefully review and consider the various disclosures made by us in this Report and in our other reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including our Registration Statement on Form S-1 as of the time it became effective, which discusses our business and related risks in greater detail, as well as subsequent reports we may file from time to time on Forms 10-Q and 8-K, for additional information.   The section entitled “Risk Factors” contained in Part II, Item 1A of this Report, and similar discussions in our other SEC filings, also describe some of the important risk factors that may affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and/or liquidity. You should carefully consider those risks, in addition to the other information in this Report and in our other filings with the SEC, before deciding to purchase, hold or sell our common stock.

 

This Report contains forward-looking statements, which include, but are not limited to the Company’s expected future financial position, results of operations, cash flows, financing plans, business strategy, budgets, capital expenditures, competitive positions, growth opportunities and plans and objectives of management.  Forward-looking statements can often be identified by words such as “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “predicts,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “would,” “could,” “potential,” “continue,” “ongoing,” similar expressions, and variations or negatives of these words. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Therefore, our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those expressed in any forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, some of which are listed under the section “Risk Factors” contained in Part II, Item 1A of this Report. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this Report, and are based on our current expectations, estimates and projections about our industry and business, management’s beliefs, and certain assumptions made by us, all of which are subject to change. We undertake no obligation to revise or update publicly any forward-looking statement for any reason, except as otherwise required by law.  As used in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, the words, “we,” “our” and “us” refer to The Ensign Group, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries. This Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and related notes included in the Registration Statement .

 

Overview

 

We are a provider of skilled nursing and rehabilitative care services through the operation of 61 facilities located in California, Arizona, Texas, Washington, Utah and Idaho. All of these facilities are skilled nursing facilities, other than three stand-alone assisted living facilities in Arizona and Texas and four campuses that offer both skilled nursing and assisted living services in California, Arizona and Utah. Our facilities provide a broad spectrum of skilled nursing and assisted living services, physical, occupational and speech therapies, and other rehabilitative and healthcare services, for both long-term residents and short-stay rehabilitation patients. We encourage and empower our facility leaders and staff to make their facility the “facility of choice” in the community it serves. This means that our facility leaders and staff are generally free to discern and address the unique needs and priorities of healthcare professionals, customers and other stakeholders in the local community or market, and then work to create a superior service offering and reputation for that particular community or market to encourage prospective customers and referral sources to choose or recommend the facility. As of September 30, 2007, we owned 23 of our facilities and operated an additional 38 facilities under long-term lease arrangements, and had options to purchase, or purchase agreements in place, for 13 of those 38 facilities. Assuming the expected closing of outstanding purchase agreements, we will own 27 of our facilities, operate 34 facilities under long-term lease arrangements and hold options to purchase nine of our leased facilities. The following table summarizes our facilities and licensed and independent living beds by ownership status as of September 30, 2007:

 

 

 

Owned

 

Leased (with a
Purchase Option)

 

Leased (without a
Purchase Option)

 

Total

 

Number of facilities

 

23

 

12

 

26

 

61

 

Percent of total

 

37.7

%

19.7

%

42.6

%

100

%

Skilled nursing, assisted living and independent living beds(1)(2)

 

2,954

 

1,350

 

3,144

 

7,448

 

Percent of total

 

39.7

%

18.1

%

42.2

%

100

%

 


(1)                                 Includes 671 beds in our 460 assisted living units and 84 independent living units. All of the independent living units are located at one of our assisted living facilities.

 

(2)                                 All bed counts are licensed beds except for independent living beds, and may not reflect the number of beds actually available for patient use.

 

23



 

The Ensign Group, Inc. is a holding company with no direct operating assets, employees or revenues. All of our facilities are operated by separate, wholly-owned, independent subsidiaries, which have their own management, employees and assets. In addition, one of our wholly-owned independent subsidiaries, which we call our Service Center, provides centralized accounting, payroll, human resources, information technology, legal, risk management and other services to each operating subsidiary through contractual relationships between such subsidiaries.  In addition, we have a wholly-owned captive insurance subsidiary that provides some claims-made coverage to our operating subsidiaries for general and professional liability, as well as for certain workers’ compensation insurance liabilities.

 

Recent Developments

 

On November 15, 2007, in connection with our IPO, we sold 4.0 million shares of common stock, and on November 20, 2007, certain selling stockholders sold 0.6 million shares of common stock upon exercise in full of the over-allotment option, each at the IPO price of $16.00 per share.  The proceeds to us from the IPO, net of underlying discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us (Net Proceeds), were approximately $56.5 million.  Concurrently with the closing of our IPO, all previously outstanding shares of preferred stock converted into 2.7 million shares of our common stock.

 

Facility Acquisition History

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

September 30,

 

 

 

1999

 

2000

 

2001

 

2002

 

2003

 

2004

 

2005

 

2006

 

2007

 

Cumulative number of facilities

 

5

 

13

 

19

 

24

 

41

 

43

 

46

 

57

 

61

 

Cumulative number of skilled nursing, assisted living and independent living beds(1)

 

710

 

1,645

 

2,244

 

2,919

 

5,147

 

5,401

 

5,780

 

6,940

 

7,448

 

 


(1)                                 Includes 671 beds in our 460 assisted living units and 84 independent living units. The cumulative number of skilled nursing, assisted living and independent living beds is calculated using the current number of licensed beds at each facility and may differ from the number of beds at the time of acquisition. We may also temporarily or permanently expand or reduce the number of beds in connection with renovations or expansions of specific facilities. All bed counts are licensed beds except independent living beds, and may not reflect the number of beds actually available for patient use.

 

In the first six months of 2007, we acquired three additional long-term care facilities for an aggregate purchase price of $9.4 million in cash, which included two skilled nursing facilities in Texas and one skilled nursing facility in Utah. In July 2007, we exercised an option to purchase one of our leased skilled nursing facilities for $3.3 million in cash. In addition, in July 2007, we entered into an operating lease agreement for a long-term care facility in Utah that is licensed for both skilled nursing and assisted living services. Since the facility was not profitable at the time, the prior operator voluntarily relinquished its leasehold to its affiliated landlord for no material consideration. We did not make any material payments to the prior facility operator, and we did not acquire any assets or assume any liabilities, other than our rights and obligations under a new operating lease and operations transfer agreement, as part of this transaction. We also simultaneously entered into a separate contract with the property owner to purchase the underlying property for $3.0 million, pending the property owner’s resolution of certain boundary line issues with neighboring property owners. We expect that we will purchase the property under the contract if and when these title issues are resolved. Regardless of whether the title issues are resolved, we have the option to purchase the property for $3.0 million under the operating lease.

 

On December 11, 2007, we completed an asset purchase agreement to purchase two skilled nursing facilities in California and one assisted living facility in Arizona, which also provides independent living services, for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $12.8 million.  Prior to the purchase, we operated these three facilities under a single master lease agreement. The master lease agreement included purchase options for the two skilled nursing facilities that were not exercisable at the time of purchase.  Purchasing these leased facilities resulted in no net change in our total number of beds. Taking into consideration the above facility purchase, we own 26 of our facilities and operate 35 of our facilities under long-term lease arrangements, with options to purchase or purchase agreements for ten of those 35 facilities.

 

24



 

The following table sets forth the location and number of licensed and independent living beds located at our facilities as of September 30, 2007:

 

 

 

CA

 

AZ

 

TX

 

UT

 

WA

 

ID

 

Total

 

Number of facilities

 

31

 

12

 

10

 

4

 

3

 

1

 

61

 

Skilled nursing, assisted living and independent living beds(1)(2)

 

3,529

 

1,952

 

1,154

 

442

 

283

 

88

 

7,448

 

 


(1)                                 Includes 671 beds in our 460 assisted living units and 84 independent living units.

 

(2)                                 All bed counts are licensed beds except for independent living beds, and may not reflect the number of beds actually available for patient use.

 

Key Performance Indicators

 

We manage our skilled nursing business by monitoring key performance indicators that affect our financial performance. These indicators and their definitions include the following:

 

·                  Routine revenue:  Routine revenue is generated by the contracted daily rate charged for all contractually inclusive services. The inclusion of therapy and other ancillary treatments varies by payor source and by contract. Services provided outside of the routine contractual agreement are recorded separately as ancillary revenue, including Medicare Part B therapy services, and are not included in the routine revenue definition.

 

·                  Skilled revenue:  The amount of routine revenue generated from patients in our skilled nursing facilities who are receiving care under Medicare or managed care reimbursement, referred to as “Medicare and managed care patients.” Skilled revenue excludes any revenue generated from our assisted living services.

 

·                  Skilled mix:  The amount of our skilled revenue as a percentage of our total routine revenue. Skilled mix (in days) represents the number of days our Medicare and managed care patients are receiving services at our skilled nursing facilities divided by the total number of days patients from all payor sources are receiving services at our skilled nursing facilities for any given period.

 

·                  Quality mix:  The amount of routine non-Medicaid revenue as a percentage of our total routine revenue. Quality mix (in days) represents the number of days our non-Medicaid patients are receiving services at our skilled nursing facilities divided by the total number of days patients from all payor sources are receiving services at our skilled nursing facilities for any given period.

 

·                  Average daily rates:  The routine revenue by payor source for a period at our skilled nursing facilities divided by actual patient days for that revenue source for that given period.

 

·                  Occupancy percentage:  The total number of residents occupying a bed in a skilled nursing, assisted living or independent living facility as a percentage of the number of licensed and independent living beds in the facility.

 

·                  Number of facilities and licensed beds:  The total number of skilled nursing, assisted living and independent living facilities that we own or operate and the total number of licensed and independent living beds associated with these facilities. Independent living beds do not have a licensing requirement.

 

Skilled and Quality Mix.  Like most skilled nursing providers, we measure both patient days and revenue by payor. Medicare and managed care patients, whom we refer to as high acuity patients, typically require a higher level of skilled nursing and rehabilitative care. Accordingly, Medicare and managed care reimbursement rates are typically higher than from other payors. In most states, Medicaid reimbursement rates are generally the lowest of all payor types. Changes in the payor mix can significantly affect our revenue and profitability.

 

25



 

The following table summarizes our skilled mix and quality mix for the periods indicated as a percentage of our total routine revenue (less revenue from assisted living services) and as a percentage of total patient days:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

Skilled Mix:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Days

 

21.9

%

24.2

%

22.7

%

24.5

%

Revenue

 

40.7

%

44.1

%

41.8

%

44.7

%

Quality Mix:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Days

 

35.1

%

37.6

%

35.8

%

37.8

%

Revenue

 

53.9

%

57.0

%

54.8

%

57.5

%

 

Occupancy.  We define occupancy as the actual patient days (one patient day equals one patient or resident occupying one bed for one day) during any measurement period as a percentage of the number of available patient days for that period. Available patient days are determined by multiplying the number of licensed and independent living beds in service during the measurement period by the number of calendar days in the measurement period. During any measurement period, the number of licensed and independent living beds in a skilled nursing, assisted living or independent living facility that are actually available to us may be less than the actual licensed and independent living bed capacity due to, among other things, temporary bed suspensions as a result of low occupancy levels, the voluntary or other imposition of quarantines or bed holds, or the dedication of bed space to other uses.

 

The following table summarizes our occupancy statistics for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

Occupancy:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Licensed and independent living beds at end of period(1)

 

7,448

 

6,602

 

7,448

 

6,602

 

Available patient days

 

682,522

 

587,633

 

1,988,894

 

1,659,347

 

Actual patient days

 

532,459

 

476,787

 

1,546,083

 

1,355,323

 

Occupancy percentage

 

78.0

%

81.1

%

77.7

%

81.7

%

 


(1)                                 The number of licensed beds is calculated using the historical number of beds licensed at each facility. All bed counts are licensed beds except for independent living beds, and may not reflect the number of beds actually available for patient use.

 

Revenue Sources

 

Our total revenue represents revenue derived primarily from providing services to patients and residents of skilled nursing facilities, and to a lesser extent from assisted living facilities and ancillary services. We receive service revenue from Medicaid, Medicare, private payors and other third-party payors, and managed care sources. The sources and amounts of our revenue are determined by a number of factors, including licensed bed capacity and occupancy rates of our healthcare facilities, the mix of patients at our facilities and the rates of reimbursement among payors. Payment for ancillary services varies based upon the service provided and the type of payor. The following table sets forth our total revenue by payor source and as a percentage of total revenue for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

$

 

%

 

$

 

%

 

$

 

%

 

$

 

%

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medicare

 

$

30,011

 

28.8

%

$

30,070

 

32.6

%

$

89,707

 

29.7

%

$

86,175

 

33.0

%

Managed care

 

13,100

 

12.6

 

11,472

 

12.4

 

38,807

 

12.8

 

32,559

 

12.5

 

Private and other payors(1)

 

14,074

 

13.5

 

12,163

 

13.2

 

40,200

 

13.3

 

34,252

 

13.1

 

Medicaid

 

46,907

 

45.1

 

38,633

 

41.8

 

133,625

 

44.2

 

108,079

 

41.4

 

Total revenue

 

$

104,092

 

100.0

%

$

92,338

 

100.0

%

$

302,339

 

100.0

%

261,065

 

100.0

%

 


(1)           Includes revenue from assisted living facilities.

 

26



 

Critical Accounting Policies Update

 

There have been no significant changes during the three and nine month periods ended September 30, 2007 to the items that we disclosed as our critical accounting policies and estimates in our discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations in our Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the SEC.

 

Industry Trends

 

Effects of Changing Prices.  Medicare reimbursement rates and procedures are subject to change from time to time, which could materially impact our revenue. Medicare reimburses our skilled nursing facilities under a prospective payment system (PPS) for certain inpatient covered services. Under the PPS, facilities are paid a predetermined amount per patient, per day, based on the anticipated costs of treating patients. The amount to be paid is determined by classifying each patient into a resource utilization group (RUG) category that is based upon each patient’s acuity level. As of January 1, 2006, the RUG categories were expanded from 44 to 53, with increased reimbursement rates for treating higher acuity patients. The new rules also implemented a market basket increase that increased rates by 3.1% for fiscal year 2006. At the same time, Congress terminated certain temporary add-on payments that were added in 1999 and 2000 as the nursing home industry came under financial pressure from prior Medicare cuts. While the 2006 Medicare skilled nursing facility payment rates will not decrease payments to skilled nursing facilities, the loss of revenue associated with future changes in skilled nursing facility payments could, in the future, have an adverse impact on our financial condition or results of operation.

 

The Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (DRA) is expected to significantly reduce net Medicare and Medicaid spending. Prior to the DRA, caps on annual reimbursements for rehabilitation therapy became effective on January 1, 2006. The DRA provides for exceptions to those caps for patients with certain conditions or multiple complexities whose therapy is reimbursed under Medicare Part B and provided in 2006. These exceptions have been extended to December 31, 2007. If these exceptions are not renewed, our revenues would be negatively impacted.

 

On February 5, 2007, the Bush Administration released its fiscal year 2008 budget proposal, which, if enacted, would reduce Medicare spending by approximately $5.3 billion in fiscal year 2008 and $75.9 billion over five years. In particular, the budget proposal is expected to freeze payments in fiscal year 2008 for skilled nursing facilities, and the payment update would be 0.65% less than the routine inflation update (or market basket increase) annually thereafter. The budget also would move toward site-neutral post-hospital payments to limit what the Administration characterizes as inappropriate incentives for five conditions commonly treated in both skilled nursing facilities and inpatient rehabilitation facilities. All bad debt reimbursement for unpaid beneficiary cost-sharing would be eliminated over four years. In addition, a budget mechanism would be established to automatically reduce Medicare spending if the portion of Medicare expenditures funded through general revenue is projected to exceed 45% within the next seven years. The budget also includes a series of proposals having an impact on Medicaid, including legislative and administrative changes that would reduce Medicaid payments by almost $26 billion over five years. Many of the proposed policy changes would require congressional approval to implement.

 

Historically, adjustments to reimbursement under Medicare have had a significant effect on our revenue. For a discussion of historic adjustments and recent changes to the Medicare program and related reimbursement rates see Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business and Industry—“Our revenue could be impacted by federal and state changes to reimbursement and other aspects of Medicaid and Medicare,” “Our future revenue, financial condition and results of operations could be impacted by continued cost containment pressures on Medicaid spending,” and “If Medicare reimbursement rates decline, our revenue, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.” The federal government and state governments continue to focus on efforts to curb spending on healthcare programs such as Medicare and Medicaid. We are not able to predict the outcome of the legislative process. We also cannot predict the extent to which proposals will be adopted or, if adopted and implemented, what effect, if any, such proposals and existing new legislation will have on us. Efforts to impose reduced allowances, greater discounts and more stringent cost controls by government and other payors are expected to continue and could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

27



 

Results of Operations

 

The following table sets forth details of our revenue, expenses and earnings as a percentage of total revenue for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

Revenue

 

100.0

%

100.0

%

100.0

%

100.0

%

Expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of services (exclusive of facility rent and depreciation and amortization shown separately below)

 

82.8

 

78.8

 

81.8

 

79.0

 

Facility rent—cost of services

 

4.0

 

4.5

 

4.1

 

4.7

 

General and administrative expense

 

3.8

 

4.2

 

3.8

 

4.0

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

1.8

 

1.2

 

1.7

 

1.1

 

Total expenses

 

92.4

 

88.7

 

91.4

 

88.8

 

Income from operations

 

7.6

 

11.3

 

8.6

 

11.2

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

(1.2

)

(0.8

)

(1.2

)

(0.8

)

Interest income

 

0.3

 

0.2

 

0.3

 

0.2

 

Other expense, net

 

(0.9

)

(0.6

)

(0.9

)

(0.6

)

Income before provision for income taxes

 

6.7

 

10.7

 

7.7

 

10.6

 

Provision for income taxes

 

2.4

 

3.8

 

3.0

 

4.0

 

Net income

 

4.3

%

6.9

%

4.7

%

6.6

%

 

The table below reconciles net income to EBITDA and EBITDAR for the periods presented:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Consolidated Statement of Income Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

4,466

 

$

6,381

 

$

14,298

 

$

17,199

 

Interest expense, net

 

1,013

 

531

 

2,664

 

1,571

 

Provision for income taxes

 

2,447

 

3,480

 

9,047

 

10,561

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

1,818

 

1,103

 

5,004

 

2,861

 

EBITDA

 

$

9,744

 

$

11,495

 

$

31,013

 

$

32,192

 

Facility rent—cost of services

 

4,177

 

4,170

 

12,511

 

12,260

 

EBITDAR

 

$

13,921

 

$

15,665

 

$

43,524

 

$

44,452

 

 


(1)                                 EBITDA and EBITDAR are supplemental non-GAAP financial measures. Regulation G, Conditions for Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures, and other provisions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, define and prescribe the conditions for use of certain non-GAAP financial information. We calculate EBITDA as net income before (a) interest expense, net, (b) provision for income taxes, and (c) depreciation and amortization. We calculate EBITDAR by adjusting EBITDA to exclude facility rent—cost of services. These non-GAAP financial measures are used in addition to and in conjunction with results presented in accordance with GAAP. These non-GAAP financial measures should not be relied upon to the exclusion of GAAP financial measures. These non-GAAP financial measures reflect an additional way of viewing aspects of our operations that, when viewed with our GAAP results and the accompanying reconciliations to corresponding GAAP financial measures, provide a more complete understanding of factors and trends affecting our business.

 

28



 

We believe EBITDA and EBITDAR are useful to investors and other external users of our financial statements in evaluating our operating performance because:

 

·                  they are widely used by investors and analysts in our industry as a supplemental measure to evaluate the overall operating performance of companies in our industry without regard to items such as interest expense, net and depreciation and amortization, which can vary substantially from company to company depending on the book value of assets, capital structure and the method by which assets were acquired; and

 

·                  they help investors evaluate and compare the results of our operations from period to period by removing the impact of our capital structure and asset base from our operating results.

 

We use EBITDA and EBITDAR:

 

·                  as measurements of our operating performance to assist us in comparing our operating performance on a consistent basis;

 

·                  to design incentive compensation and goal setting;

 

·                  to allocate resources to enhance the financial performance of our business;

 

·                  to evaluate the effectiveness of our operational strategies; and

 

·                  to compare our operating performance to that of our competitors.

 

We typically use EBITDA and EBITDAR to compare the operating performance of each skilled nursing and assisted living facility. EBITDA and EBITDAR are useful in this regard because they do not include such costs as net interest expense, income taxes, depreciation and amortization expense, and, with respect to EBITDAR, facility rent—cost of services, which may vary from period-to-period depending upon various factors, including the method used to finance facilities, the amount of debt that we have incurred, whether a facility is owned or leased, the date of acquisition of a facility or business, or the tax law of the state in which a business unit operates. As a result, we believe that the use of EBITDA and EBITDAR provide a meaningful and consistent comparison of our business between periods by eliminating certain items required by GAAP.

 

We also establish compensation programs and bonuses for our facility level employees that are partially based upon the achievement of EBITDAR targets.

 

Despite the importance of these measures in analyzing our underlying business, designing incentive compensation and for our goal setting, EBITDA and EBITDAR are non-GAAP financial measures that have no standardized meaning defined by GAAP. Therefore, our EBITDA and EBITDAR measures have limitations as analytical tools, and they should not be considered in isolation, or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under GAAP. Some of these limitations are:

 

·                  they do not reflect our current or future cash requirements for capital expenditures or contractual commitments;

 

·                  they do not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs;

 

·                  they do not reflect the net interest expense, or the cash requirements necessary to service interest or principal payments, on our debt;

 

·                  they do not reflect any income tax payments we may be required to make;

 

·                  although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated and amortized will often have to be replaced in the future, and EBITDA and EBITDAR do not reflect any cash requirements for such replacements; and

 

29



 

·                  other companies in our industry may calculate these measures differently than we do, which may limit their usefulness as comparative measures.

 

We compensate for these limitations by using them only to supplement net income on a basis prepared in accordance with GAAP in order to provide a more complete understanding of the factors and trends affecting our business.

 

Management strongly encourages investors to review our consolidated financial statements in their entirety and to not rely on any single financial measure. Because these non-GAAP financial measures are not standardized, it may not be possible to compare these financial measures with other companies’ non-GAAP financial measures having the same or similar names. For information about our financial results as reported in accordance with GAAP, see our condensed consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this document.

 

Three Months Ended September 30, 2007 Compared to Three Months Ended September 30, 2006

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

Change

 

 

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

Same Facility Results:

 

 

 

Revenue.

 

$

86,423

 

$

85,570

 

1.0

%

Number of facilities at period end.

 

46

 

46

 

0.0

%

Actual patient days

 

435,303

 

438,508

 

(0.7

)%

Occupancy percentage

 

82.0

%

82.4

%

(0.4

)%

Skilled mix by nursing days

 

22.9

%

24.8

%

(1.9

)%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recently Acquired Facility Results:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue.

 

$

17,669

 

$

6,768

 

161.1

%

Number of facilities at period end.

 

15

 

8

 

87.5

%

Actual patient days

 

97,156

 

38,279

 

153.8

%

Occupancy percentage

 

64.0

%

69.0

%

(5.0

)%

Skilled mix by nursing days.

 

17.7

%

17.1

%

0.6

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Facility Results:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue.

 

$

104,092

 

$

92,338

 

12.7

%

Number of facilities at period end.

 

61

 

54

 

13.0

%

Actual patient days

 

532,459

 

476,787

 

11.7

%

Occupancy percentage

 

78.0

%

81.1

%

(3.1

)%

Skilled mix by nursing days

 

21.9

%

24.2

%

(2.3

)%

 

Revenue.  Revenue increased $11.8 million, or 12.7%, to $104.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2007 compared to $92.3 million for the three months ended September 30, 2006. Of the $11.8 million increase, skilled revenue (Medicare and managed care) increased $1.7 million, or 4.4%, Medicaid revenue increased $8.3 million, or 21.4%, and private and other revenue increased $1.9 million, or 15.7%.  These increases were offset in part by a decrease of $0.2 million in Medicare Part B revenue.

 

Revenue generated by facilities acquired prior to January 1, 2006 (Same Facilities) increased $0.9 million, or 1.0%, for the three months ended September 30, 2007 as compared to the three months ended September 30, 2006.  This increase was primarily due to higher reimbursement rates relative to the three months ended September 30, 2006, as described below, partially offset by a decline in skilled mix and occupancy rate. Same Facility skilled mix and occupancy rate declines of 1.9% and 0.4%, respectively, were primarily attributable to two facilities, where revenues decreased by an aggregate of $1.4 million. This decrease in revenue was primarily attributable to Medicare due to local market factors. These revenue declines were more than offset by the increases in daily reimbursement rates.

 

Approximately $10.9 million of the total revenue increase was due to revenue generated by facilities acquired during 2006 and 2007 (Recently Acquired Facilities) which was primarily attributable to the increase in actual patient days.  This growth was hindered in part by generally lower occupancy rates, and lower skilled mix and quality mix at such facilities.  Historically, we have generally experienced lower occupancy rates, lower skilled mix and quality mix in Recently Acquired Facilities, and we expect this trend to continue.

 

30



 

The following table reflects the change in the skilled nursing average daily revenue rates by payor source, excluding therapy and other ancillary services that are not covered by the daily rate:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

Total

 

Acquisitions

 

Same Facility

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

 

Skilled Nursing Average Daily Revenue Rates:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medicare

 

$

446.38